Study Religion: The Podcast Episode 2 “Turkey Ritual”

In this episode we think about the ways we categorize things as religion. The show begins with the ritual life of turkeys and what that tells us about the category “religion.” Then a few REL majors show us how the category “sacrifice” is all around us. Finally, host Michael Altman talks with Dr. Megan Goodwin (@mpgphd) about the new CNN show Believer and how religious studies can find a broader public audience.

 

Show notes:

Turkey ritual

Hubert and Mauss on sacrifice

Kathryn McClymond on sacrifice

Edward B. Tylor and William Robertson Smith on sacrifice

Believer on CNN

 

Profs. Altman and Goodwin’s twitter conversation about Believer

Megan Goodwin’s excellent new article

50th Anniversary Fun Fact #11

Although dating to 1932, in 2016-17 we’re celebrating our 50th anniversary, given how the Department was reinvented in 1966-7 — in keeping with how the study of religion was established then across public universities in the US. No longer confessionally-oriented and staffed by campus ministers, it became a cross-culturally comparative and interdisciplinary field.

So all semester we’ll be posting some weekly fun facts from 1966 — not that long ago for some of us yet ancient history for others. Continue reading

50th Anniversary Fun Fact #10

Although dating to 1932, in 2016-17 we’re celebrating our 50th anniversary, given how the Department was reinvented in 1966-7 — in keeping with how the study of religion was established then across public universities in the US. No longer confessionally-oriented and staffed by campus ministers, it became a cross-culturally comparative and interdisciplinary field.

So all semester we’ll be posting some weekly fun facts from 1966 — not that long ago for some of us yet ancient history for others. Continue reading

Yes, Patches O’Houlihan is My Pedagogical Mentor

You seen “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” (2004)?

No?

Well it provides some important pedagogical lessons. Continue reading

50th Anniversary Fun Fact #9

Although dating to 1932, in 2016-17 we’re celebrating our 50th anniversary, given how the Department was reinvented in 1966-7 — in keeping with how the study of religion was established then across public universities in the US. No longer confessionally-oriented and staffed by campus ministers, it became a cross-culturally comparative and interdisciplinary field.

So all semester we’ll be posting some weekly fun facts from 1966 — not that long ago for some of us yet ancient history for others. Continue reading

“Are You in There, Satan?”

Ok, on the heels of a post, earlier today, about explaining the behavior of turkeys, I just came across this video and a friend’s fun comment about this possibly being evidence of the gates of hell.

It’s in a cemetery, after all. Continue reading

“The Craziest Thing I’ve Ever Seen”

Over on social media the other day, I came across the following tweet, posted at NPR’s site.

My comment, used above as this post’s opening pic, wasn’t completely sarcastic. Continue reading

On Religion, Words, and Things: A Reply

Brent Nongbri, from whom this response was invited, is a Visiting Associate Professor at Aarhus University. He recently completed a three-year project at Macquarie University (sponsored by the Australian Research Council) that explored the earliest Christian manuscripts from a number of angles, focusing on issues of construction and dating as well as provenance and collection history. The results of the project will appear in his forthcoming book on the archaeology of the earliest Christian manuscripts.

I’m grateful to the curators of “Studying Religion in Culture” for this opportunity to reflect a bit on “words and things,” and I would also like to thank the previous posters in this series for their insightful contributions on this topic and on the problems and prospects of working with the concept of religion.

I’ll start off my own comments, however, on a word other than “religion.” Continue reading

History, Identity, and Memory: The ‘Melting Pot’ is Bubbling Over!

The recent flap over the January 27, 2017, official White House Press Release of President Trump’s Statement on International Holocaust Remembrance Day and its egregious omission of the primary victims of the Nazi genocide—the Jews—instead identifying and honoring “the [unnamed and unreferenced] victims, survivors, and heroes” beggars logic.  Coming as it did on the heels of the “Executive Order: Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorists Entry into the United States”—and attempting to temporarily ban legitimate refugees from seven predominantly Muslim-majority countries [Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen]—only compounds the absurdity of the Statement and reveals the astounding ignorance of those seemingly hard at work at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.  More to the point, however, one may also perceive the Statement as part of an overall commitment to whitewashing—yes, the word is pointedly chosen! —religious, ethnic, historical, and racial differences and diversities which remain unique to this experiment we call the United States in favor of a false homogenization whereby we are all alike, even though we are not.  Taken to its absurd extreme, it may yet prove to be but one more example, early on, of the President’s pandering to his own electoral base of primarily disgruntled white males on the economic fringes (both the haves and the have-nots) as a not-so-thinly-disguised attempt to re-paint American society in only one color and only one set of identifying labels (white, male, citizen, hard-working, Protestant, and/or what have you). Continue reading

“An Intense Experience”

Readers in the US may have already seen the commercials for Reza Aslan‘s upcoming series, Believer.

It starts Sunday March 5 on CNN at 10 pm (eastern time). Continue reading